"Cavities" is the common term for dental decay, more properly known as caries, which is Latin for rottenness. Caries is one of the most common diseases in man but is less commonly seen in dogs, however, it can and does occur and your veterinarian should be checking for them at every dental cleaning.

When identified early, caries can be treated effectively by a qualified veterinarian with the training necessary to perform the procedure. If caries are left untreated, the decay will continue to destroy tooth structure until bacteria reach the pulp chamber, causing in internal infection and eventually killing the tooth. Early cavities may not be painful or only cause slight sensitivity while chewing. As the decay progresses into the more sensitive parts of the tooth, it causes significant pain.

Caries in dogs are typically treated in the same way as cavities in humans with removal of the dead and infected tooth material followed by restoration (filling) of the defect in the tooth surface.

  Dental Decay (Caries) in a Dog   Canine Dental Restoration for a Cavity  
  Dental decay (Caries) in a dog can lead to more serious health issues for your canine pet.   A qualified vet can treat the infected tooth and perform a restoration of the tooth surface.